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Allen Iverson shoe shops in Philly đź‘ź

Iverson remembers getting his electricity cut off to buy Nikes

Allen Iverson may have a lifetime sponsorship deal from Reebok, but the Sixers legend’s very first hot kicks were a pair of oversize Nike Air Revolutions. He remembers them because his mom gave up something important for Iverson to have them: Electricity.

Soul Head To Baltimore For Saturday Match-Up

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — The Philadelphia Soul will play their penultimate game of their regular season on Saturday afternoon when they visit the Baltimore Brigade.

Philadelphia is coming off a bye week.

“It was a nice bye week, especially after a big win against Washington,” Soul head coach Clint Dolezel tells KYW Newsradio. “We finally handled them like we wanted to handle them earlier in the season.”

The Soul are 11-1 and they have already clinched home-field advantage throughout the postseason. That one loss? It came against Baltimore earlier this month on July 8th, the Soul losing 49-42.

“There’s a lot that went against us in that game,” Dolezel says. “But all could’ve been remedied if we just do the little things right in that particular instance.”

Baltimore is 4-8 and the Brigade are fighting for the final AFL playoff spot, which they will clinch with one more win or one more Washington loss. While the Soul have wrapped up everything they can in the regular season, Dolezel wants a sharp performance against the Brigade.

“Our mindset’s to go in there and handle business,” he says. “Be strong going into the playoffs, we don’t want to limp into the playoffs, winning barely or even with another loss. We’re going to win these last two games and that’s our mindset.”

The Soul and the Brigade get underway at 1:00pm.

Neumann-Goretti’s Josh Ockimey A Top Prospect For Red Sox

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — One of the top prospects in the minor league system of the Boston Red Sox spent his high school days punishing pitchers in the Catholic League here in Philadelphia.

Neumann-Goretti product Josh Ockimey is enjoying a fine season for Boston’s Single-A squad in the Carolina League, the Salem Red Sox.
A first baseman, the 21-year-old Ockimey is enjoying what is probably his best season as a pro to this point, batting .278 with 11 home runs and he is tied for the lead in the Carolina League with 63 runs batted in.

“One thing we really worked on this year is rhythm,” Ockimey told KYW Newsradio after a recent game in Wilmington. “Being on time and being in a good position to hit. One thing me and our mental strength coach talk about is really trusting yourself and keeping things positive. So all year, whether I’m 2 for 15 or 1 for 20, tomorrow’s a new day, tomorrow’s a great day to go 4 for 4. So that’s one thing I’ve really been working on and I definitely see the difference.”

The left-handed hitter has also shown a good eye at the plate. So far he has 65 walks this season, helping him to a .393 on-base percentage.

Ockimey was a fifth-round draft pick of Boston out of high school back in 2014 and he has moved up a level in the organization every year since then.

The ball really jump off Ockimey’s bat and while he can obviously hit the ball out of the yard, he says it’s not a real focus for him.

“One thing I’ve really been trying to do this year is more focus on gap-to-gap, not really going for power,” he says. “If you get it, it goes, but I really just want to hit a line drive in the gap somewhere.”

Ockimey remembers his high school days at Neumann-Goretti fondly.

“It made me the player I am today,” he says. “They always taught inner city toughness and I take that into today’s game. We’re not going to back down, we’re here to kick butt and take names.”

If you have any doubt of the impact that Ockimey had on the Saints’ program, consider that his number at Neumann Goretti has been retired.

“That was a great honor,” Ockimey says. “Number 30, that’s been my number since I was 11 or 12. It was a great honor.”

Ockimey and the Salem Red Sox host Frederick on Friday night.

Keidel: Dallas Cowboys Traveling Circus

By Jason Keidel

Now that the fairy dust has faded from the 2016 season, we once again see what a traveling circus the Dallas Cowboys really are.

Players getting cut for crimes they didn’t commit. Players who would be cut if they didn’t produce so much. Recycled statements as a press conference. And a nipple ring.

And it makes you wonder if those of us who long resisted their unworthy handle as America’s Team may be missing the point.

The Dallas Cowboys aren’t our nation’s football club because they are the best. Two playoff wins this century certainly don’t warrant such regal nicknames. Indeed, if victory were the criterion, you have Tom Brady and the Patriots. Or, if you take a longer view, the Green Bay Packers or Pittsburgh Steelers. The latter two surely have as many fans as Dallas does, and each group travels with equal mass and force.

Perhaps the Cowboys are so highly regarded because they have something for everyone, equal parts back page, front page and Page Six. Like a car wreck, it really is impossible to look away from the star on the helmet.

>>MORE: Commentary from CBS Local Sports Voices

Whether it’s Duane Thomas refusing to speak to his teammates, coaches or the press, Hollywood Henderson hiding narcotics in this thigh pads, the bizarre QB shuffle between Roger Staubach and Craig Morton or the melodrama of the ’90s, led by the tete-a-tete between Jimmy Johnson and Jerry Jones, the Cowboys are a soap opera that even Susan Lucci can get with.

Fast-forward 25 years, and not much has changed. We have Lucky Whitehead, cut over a crime he didn’t commit, followed by Jason Garrett’s absurd, monotone presser, in which he branded the move “in the best interest of the Dallas Cowboys” about five times in two minutes. Not only did Whitehead get jobbed, he was punished once again by being picked up by the Jets.

We have Ezekiel Elliott, who can’t seem to stay out of trouble. Had Elliott been a backup rather than the NFL’s leading rusher, he would have joined Whitehead in the league’s recycle bin. But morality is always relative with the NFL in general and Dallas in particular. Greg Hardy pushed the bounds of civility and humanity, yet Dallas rolled the dice, not out of altruism but avarice. Likewise with Pacman Jones.

>>MORE: Keidel: Is Cowboys’ Ezekiel Elliott A Leader Or Headcase?

Jerry Jones was his indignant best this week, defending the release of Whitehead and his record as the Father Flanagan of pro football. The Cowboys owner lectured local media on his paternal responsibilities with players past and present. Funny how that works as long as the surrogate sons lead the team in yards or points or jersey sales. It’s all a facade for cost-benefit analysis. As soon as the player stops producing, he also loses his charm, his usefulness, and his locker.

And for comic relief, beyond the dubious characters, the Cowboys also invest in exotic jewelry. (Just Google David Irving for the rest.)

At some point every NFL team has engaged in some form of moral or legal relativism, wondering if they can brush a player’s past under the rug long enough to let him loose on the gridiron. Yes, your team, too. And we clearly indulge them, or else the NFL wouldn’t generate over $10 billion in yearly revenue. We’re all a little dirty.

But no team is as public or prolific in their self-righteousness as the Dallas Cowboys, who became America’s Team in the 1970s, when they actually backed up the moniker with Super Bowl appearances (and a couple rings). They were reality TV before we had a name for it. What’s their current reality? Are they a 13-3 club with a sprawling sideshow of miscreants? Or will they return to the .500 club with the same, corresponding circus?

Either way, we will be watching, because we love car wreck, especially those with a blue star on the side.

Jason writes a weekly column for CBS Local Sports. He is a native New Yorker, sans the elitist sensibilities, and believes there’s a world west of the Hudson River. A Yankees devotee and Steelers groupie, he has been scouring the forest of fertile NYC sports sections since the 1970s. He has written over 500 columns for WFAN/CBS NY, and also worked as a freelance writer for Sports Illustrated and Newsday subsidiary amNew York. He made his bones as a boxing writer, occasionally covering fights in Las Vegas, Atlantic City, but mostly inside Madison Square Garden. Follow him on Twitter @JasonKeidel.

Keidel: Dallas Cowboys Traveling Circus

By Jason Keidel

Now that the fairy dust has faded from the 2016 season, we once again see what a traveling circus the Dallas Cowboys really are.

Players getting cut for crimes they didn’t commit. Players who would be cut if they didn’t produce so much. Recycled statements as a press conference. And a nipple ring.

And it makes you wonder if those of us who long resisted their unworthy handle as America’s Team may be missing the point.

The Dallas Cowboys aren’t our nation’s football club because they are the best. Two playoff wins this century certainly don’t warrant such regal nicknames. Indeed, if victory were the criterion, you have Tom Brady and the Patriots. Or, if you take a longer view, the Green Bay Packers or Pittsburgh Steelers. The latter two surely have as many fans as Dallas does, and each group travels with equal mass and force.

Perhaps the Cowboys are so highly regarded because they have something for everyone, equal parts back page, front page and Page Six. Like a car wreck, it really is impossible to look away from the star on the helmet.

>>MORE: Commentary from CBS Local Sports Voices

Whether it’s Duane Thomas refusing to speak to his teammates, coaches or the press, Hollywood Henderson hiding narcotics in this thigh pads, the bizarre QB shuffle between Roger Staubach and Craig Morton or the melodrama of the ’90s, led by the tete-a-tete between Jimmy Johnson and Jerry Jones, the Cowboys are a soap opera that even Susan Lucci can get with.

Fast-forward 25 years, and not much has changed. We have Lucky Whitehead, cut over a crime he didn’t commit, followed by Jason Garrett’s absurd, monotone presser, in which he branded the move “in the best interest of the Dallas Cowboys” about five times in two minutes. Not only did Whitehead get jobbed, he was punished once again by being picked up by the Jets.

We have Ezekiel Elliott, who can’t seem to stay out of trouble. Had Elliott been a backup rather than the NFL’s leading rusher, he would have joined Whitehead in the league’s recycle bin. But morality is always relative with the NFL in general and Dallas in particular. Greg Hardy pushed the bounds of civility and humanity, yet Dallas rolled the dice, not out of altruism but avarice. Likewise with Pacman Jones.

>>MORE: Keidel: Is Cowboys’ Ezekiel Elliott A Leader Or Headcase?

Jerry Jones was his indignant best this week, defending the release of Whitehead and his record as the Father Flanagan of pro football. The Cowboys owner lectured local media on his paternal responsibilities with players past and present. Funny how that works as long as the surrogate sons lead the team in yards or points or jersey sales. It’s all a facade for cost-benefit analysis. As soon as the player stops producing, he also loses his charm, his usefulness, and his locker.

And for comic relief, beyond the dubious characters, the Cowboys also invest in exotic jewelry. (Just Google David Irving for the rest.)

At some point every NFL team has engaged in some form of moral or legal relativism, wondering if they can brush a player’s past under the rug long enough to let him loose on the gridiron. Yes, your team, too. And we clearly indulge them, or else the NFL wouldn’t generate over $10 billion in yearly revenue. We’re all a little dirty.

But no team is as public or prolific in their self-righteousness as the Dallas Cowboys, who became America’s Team in the 1970s, when they actually backed up the moniker with Super Bowl appearances (and a couple rings). They were reality TV before we had a name for it. What’s their current reality? Are they a 13-3 club with a sprawling sideshow of miscreants? Or will they return to the .500 club with the same, corresponding circus?

Either way, we will be watching, because we love car wreck, especially those with a blue star on the side.

Jason writes a weekly column for CBS Local Sports. He is a native New Yorker, sans the elitist sensibilities, and believes there’s a world west of the Hudson River. A Yankees devotee and Steelers groupie, he has been scouring the forest of fertile NYC sports sections since the 1970s. He has written over 500 columns for WFAN/CBS NY, and also worked as a freelance writer for Sports Illustrated and Newsday subsidiary amNew York. He made his bones as a boxing writer, occasionally covering fights in Las Vegas, Atlantic City, but mostly inside Madison Square Garden. Follow him on Twitter @JasonKeidel.

Mychal Kendricks Admits He Requested A Trade

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — It’s not often a player admits to requesting a trade. Mychal Kendricks did on Friday.

The 26-year-old Eagles linebacker told the media that he did request a trade this offseason. The Eagles responded with, “You’re young, you’re talented and we’re not into that,” according to ESPN’s Tim McManus.

Kendricks doesn’t think the door is closed on a trade just yet, so maybe he’s trying to push the process along but revealing this publicly.

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Kendricks was the Eagles’ second-round pick in 2012. The 5’11, 240-pound linebacker got off to a good start to his career, but last season — under new defensive coordinator Jim Schwartz and his 4-3 system — Kendricks played limited snaps, recording just 20 tackles and zero sacks in eight starts.

Kendricks currently has three years left on his contract and carries a $6.6 million cap hit for 2017.

Mychal Kendricks Admits He Requested A Trade

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — It’s not often a player admits to requesting a trade. Mychal Kendricks did on Friday.

The 26-year-old Eagles linebacker told the media that he did request a trade this offseason. The Eagles responded with, “You’re young, you’re talented and we’re not into that,” according to ESPN’s Tim McManus.

Kendricks doesn’t think the door is closed on a trade just yet, so maybe he’s trying to push the process along but revealing this publicly.

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Kendricks was the Eagles’ second-round pick in 2012. The 5’11, 240-pound linebacker got off to a good start to his career, but last season — under new defensive coordinator Jim Schwartz and his 4-3 system — Kendricks played limited snaps, recording just 20 tackles and zero sacks in eight starts.

Kendricks currently has three years left on his contract and carries a $6.6 million cap hit for 2017.

BREAKING NOW: SEAHAWKS SIGN EX-EAGLE MARCUS SMITH!

Seahawks are signing former Eagles first-round pick Marcus Smith, per source. Smith cleared waivers Thursday. — Adam Schefter (@AdamSchefter) July 28, 2017

The post BREAKING NOW: SEAHAWKS SIGN EX-EAGLE MARCUS SMITH! appeared first on Fast Philly Sports.